LinkedIn Photography London

Tips and ideas on how to use photography on your LinkedIn profile page.

We have posted before about the importance of your LinkedIn profile photo and the benefits of having a professional or carefully  considered headshot on your LinkedIn page but another important area to consider is the banner or background image you can customise along with the URL you can tailor  to benefit you.

The banner image which runs behind your profile photo is important as it is the second thing visitors to your profile will look at. If you leave the default LinkedIn image it looks like you could not be bothered to finish the page and therefore looks unprofessional. I have noticed that people will spend a great deal of time getting their text perfect for their page but when it comes to the use of photography on their LinkedIn profile it seems they either ignore it leaving it as default or make a vague attempt to drop something suitable in. Both or these practises are flawed as LinkedIn has become an excellent market place for professionals but also a way potential employers, clients and customers can check you out without you knowing they have had a look at your professional background.

A friend who was setting up her first LinkedIn page was told by the head of her graphic design degree course not to put a banner image featuring any of her work but just to upload a white file so it appeared neutral. I can see the thinking behind this but I do not agree with the thought process. On your LinkedIn page you should utilise every aspect to make yourself stand out in the business arena. If all the students from my friend’s course follow that advice and only one student uploads her work then which profile will stand out. I suggested she makes a collage of her work so it represents her designs and she can also tailor the background image if she is going for a certain position or commission to fit with that style.

Companies are beginning to ask us to photograph their offices and areas of their business so these images can be used on their corporate profiles. LinkedIn should become a part of your corporate branding and the use of photography is paramount in this process.

On my LinkedIn profile page I have used the image below. It consists of studio, location and office corporate headshots along with one photo of The City. These are the services we offer and the location we work at. Pretty basic stuff but hopefully just by looking at the background photo you could work out what we do and where we do it.

LinkedIn photography London

Whichever profession or business sector you or your company work in there will be decent imagery that would greatly improve your profile. Consider what you could use and if you are drawing a blank then approach designers or photographers and collect some ideas and inspiration. It might be a good idea to invest in some good photography software as the banner image has to be 1584 x 396 pixels so all photos would need cropping to fit the letter box format. As already mentioned a montage is useful to fill this shape as square or portrait images can make up the wider landscape crop.

The second point I wanted to draw attention to was the way you can customise your LinkedIn URL. It is free and can help your SEO and make your page more memorable. Simply click on the edit URL option and add your name, company or keywords. Some are taken but you can play around to find a URL which fits your profession. We are corporate photographer London which makes sense.

Please get in touch if you would like our help with your LinkedIn photos and here is an article on professional corporate headshots.

LinkedIn photography in London

 

Corporate Headshots on a White Background.

The most popular style of corporate headshot with the subject looking to camera with a white background.

For many years we have been capturing these for clients and it is only recently that we have seen a common problem occurring. Shooting headshots with a white background seems a pretty simple set up and it always was in the past. Clean crisp white Colourama and a diffused light to make it nice and blown would give you and the client exactly the effect they were after. The problems now arise with businesses and individuals putting these headshots onto company websites where they assume the white background on the headshot will match with the white of a webpage. The background will retain some element of tone and hue as the digital camera sensor will always try and level out any colour to give an average recording. You cannot get around this even by flooding the background with white light. Now we try to make clients aware of this but it does sound a little daft to the average person who says they just want a headshot on a white background. We always try and establish the end use for the headshot now as we want to prevent the problem before it arises.

In post-production we remove the headshot from the background and add a white web friendly background in photoshop. An easy process once you know how but as with all photoshop work it really depends on the workflow you use. There are a few tools that allow you to do this but some give much better results than others and one thing is for sure there is no way you can automate the process.

We recently did a shoot in London for a company with their HQ based in Hong Kong. When we sent them the original high-resolution images they were very pleased and we mentioned about the post-production work if they were going to be used on a website. About a month later we received an email noting that the Hong Kong office had flagged some problems with the shots as they were showing some marks on the white background and could we check what we had done incorrectly. After looking at the website screenshots we could tell that the headshots had been cut out incorrectly and this was the problem. The photoshop tool they had used was not that accurate and left pixels in on the white area. We have since gone on to do the cutouts for the company and the problem has been rectified. Describing this problem to clients is not an easy task and telling them it will cost extra in post-production to get the right result tends not to go down to well. We now send samples out so that they can see for themselves that you have to go through with the process.

Sample 1. Standard corporate headshot captured in camera with a white background. Technically correct but flawed for use on a white webpage as it is still retaining tone on the background. You would think that the simple solution would be to add more light to the background but this does not work as it starts to bleed through into the edges of the person and messes up the exposure.

LinkedIn headshot with a white background unedited

Sample 2. Headshot after photoshop post-production. Headshot cut out with a white web friendly colour background added. Clean and crisp and as on this webpage the background matches the white of the webpage.

Corporate headshot with a white background edited

 

If you have had this problem or need any more advise please get in touch and we can talk you through our process and improve your companies headshots. Please see also our previous article on tips for corporate headshot photography